Frustrations of a Z-Lister (on the MS Live/Firefox debate)

ok. it’s petty, i know. And I’m sure it happens to all of us. But it *is* annoying when you start a conversation about something that bothers you (like how MS Live services don’t support Firefox), and then three months later Scoble blogs about it (in response to Darren Barefoot), and suddenly it’s big news.

I know, I know. That’s how it works when 15 million people read his blog and not so many read mine (btw thanks for reading mine, I appreciate each and every one of you… now, Scoble couldn’t say that!)

Maybe one day, when Sphere finally decides to index my blog, things might change ;)

< /rant>

It was interesting to re-read my rant on the Live Mail beta. I checked back into Hotmail/Live Mail today for the first time in ages, and you can now reply (previously, as reported, Microsoft didn’t think replying was critical functionality for email – if you’re a Firefox user, that is). I’m sure I read somewhere earlier this week about Microsoft reducing the amount of advertising they included on their Live services… that doesn’t seem to be true, yet. It would certainly make for an improvement to the user experience.

links for 05 May 2006


it makes me flinch just a little when I read a page written from a usability perspective about how different countries and cultures have language and other nuances that need to be accounted for in experience design, and to find that the page is littered with US spelling. Now, I know, it was written in the States, and that’s how you spell things over there. It’s just feels a little ironic or paradoxical perhaps when the words are localization, globalization, and internationalization.

I propose that in this context (when we who talk about such things are talking to each other) we use this format: internationali(s/z)ation. It’s like a little natural reminder that the only our American friends use the letter Z with such frequency and that the rest of us English speakers have probably had Microsoft Word try to correct our spelling for the better part of the time we’ve been interactive with technology.

So, perhaps I’m a little sensitive… go take a look at this page on the new Usability Body of Knowledge website and see if you think I’m overreacting.