Good experiences on a bus (another instructional analogy)

Bus Driver

If you were in Sydney a few years ago, you might remember the best ever example of industrial action that I’ve ever seen. Rather than pulling another last-minute bus strike in peak hour and leaving people stranded in the morning unable to get to work, the bus drivers decided to run the buses – for free. Their industrial action was to refuse to collect fares. What a great way to get the right kind of attention – from the public AND from their bosses.

I’ve never understood why industrial action so often involves pissing off the people you want to support you – by striking, or holding protest marches through the city at 5pm.

I’m not really sure whether the bus drivers got what they wanted, but I do know that for quite a while, every one in Sydney was totally backing the bus drivers. They were the most popular guys in town. I bet their work was pleasant for those few weeks.

I was reminded of those days of free bus rides this morning, when I scored another free bus ride. This one was much less pleasant though, because the bus driver did NOT take the opportunity to create a positive user experience.

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links for 28 April 2006

links for 27 April 2006

  • via the Ajaxian, this is gorgeous. Lots of tiles on a page, and as people around the world move a tile, you can see it in real time (much better than it sounds). Even more amazing, see how quickly people engage in ‘play’ – (who stole my tiles! I was just
  • Exploring the nature of ethnographic inquiry, this paper suggests that “implications for design” may not be the best metric for evaluation and may, indeed, fail to capture the value of ethnographic investigations.
  • interesting looking agency who do UI ‘innovation’ and mkting. If I was moving to SF I reckon I’d be looking them up :)

Finally! Creating a Table of Contents in Visio (how did I not find this until now?!)

Call me crazy, but I feel as though I’ve just uncovered the holy grail of Visio.

I don’t know how many people I’ve asked about ways that you can create a Table of Contents in Visio. It seems like it should be sooooo easy, but no one has ever been able to help me out.

So I had a bit of ‘R&D time’ this afternoon and was playing with the Annotation Hiding Macro that Donna posted yesterday, then poked around a few of her other Visio pages, and there, in amongst some comments, I found it! A Macro that creates a Table of Contents in Visio for you.

Hoorah! Celebrations all round!

(Or did you all already know how to do this and I’ve been living under a Visio rock?!)

Now… it’s not all that pretty. But, for now, it does the trick.

Without any further ado, here it is (with many thanks to Bram!):

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