in customer research

Guerrilla Research – Recruitment

It’s been almost a year now that I’ve been doing predominantly ‘guerrilla’ design research. For me, this means testing in the field with a minimum of time, budget and fuss so that this kind of activity and the insight it provides is available to pretty much any client/budget/timeframe.

One of the first challenges for guerrilla design research is recruitment – the particular objective being to avoid using recruitment companies in order to reduce the cost of the project and also avoid the delay (often up to 2 weeks!) that is typically associated with recruitment.

A common approach to guerrilla recruitment is simply to rock up at a venue where your target audience is likely to congregate and to try to recruit on the spot. Typical venues might be a local Starbucks or a conference.

This is not an approach that I tend to use, for a couple of reasons – primarily because I really have to relinquish a lot of control over who I involve in my research… more than I feel comfortable with, given the responsibility that I have to my clients to provide them with useful insight. Also, sometimes the recruit briefs I need to meet are quite complex and require me to be quite selective when identifying participants. This is quite difficult to do on the fly and face to face… it can lead to either some awkward moments or spending time doing research with people who aren’t really quite right.

The approach that I have been using (and many of you are probably very aware of this!) is to use my online social network using tools such as my blog, Twitter, LinkedIn, and FaceBook. I have been pleasantly surprised by how successful this has been – on a number of levels.

Essentially how it works is that I work with my client to define a ‘call for participation’ that will be posted – the objective here is to get people interested in the research, to get more rather than less people to contact us, but hopefully mostly people who are at least close to right for the profile. I have to say, I am quite happy not to have to put together screeners any more (or review screeners received from recruitment companies). In fact… if I never saw another screener again I’d be perfectly happy :)

I do, up to a point, think about what ‘channels’ to use. As a gross generalisation, somewhere like Facebook is better for a less technical participant, where as Twitter is better for a more technically savvy participant… this is a gross generalisation though because more often than not, the people who I end up meeting are not directly in my network, but friends, family, colleagues of people in my network. This is the real power of ‘guerrilla’ recruiting, and a big reason why the ‘channels’ matter much less than having great people in your networks :) (Preferably great people with lots of friends, family and colleagues!)

To date, my experience has been that undertaking recruitment in this way has been cheaper (obviously – I don’t charge myself or my client ‘recruitment’ fees per participant), and faster (rather than weeks, recruits are sometimes filled within hours, definitely days of posting a call for participation). The most pleasant discovery has been that the quality of research participants is significantly higher than I had experienced when using recruitment companies.

In the past 12 months I’ve interviewed dozens of people and only had one ‘no show’ – and that was just a mix up with the dates as opposed to someone who just decided not to show. If you’ve done much research you know that it is not uncommon to have a day of six interviews lined up and only to get four participants to show up.

Some of the recruits I’ve had to fill have been fairly simple, but there have also been some incredibly complex briefs that I have no idea how I would have managed to effectively communicate to a recruitment company.

And the people who do turn up are fabulous – I’ve been amazed at how close to the ‘brief’ almost everyone I’ve met has been. They’ve been interested, enthusiastic, articulate and certainly not ‘professional research participants’ – the bane of any researchers existence!

Of course, you can always just take your design and show it to people in the office, take it home to your own family, show your friends – this can be very valuable. If you’re looking to do some research that is slightly more formalised, then perhaps you could consider using your own online social networks for this purpose.

It has certainly made me value even more the networks that I have in place and thankful for the great people who I interact with in these spaces.

(and, while I’m at it – if you’ve helped me with recruiting in the past year or so – thank you, thank you very much!)

  1. This strategy makes a ton of sense. I spent a few years doing research years ago (pre FB) and was always turned off by the sterile focus room setting and “professionally” recruited people which ended up being professional respondents.

    I have to do research for our Gardens project and I was planning to recruit from FB and linked in. I’m really happy to see that it’s so effective for you. btw, where do you usually meet people? At coffee shops?

  2. hi Linea

    yeah, I often set up office in a conveniently located Starbucks or wherever is most convenient to the participant (depending on whether or not we need internet access). Hope your recruiting goes well!

    Leisa

Comments are closed.